In this weeks Faculty Q&A, Georgetown McDonough Assistant Professor of Ethics, Sunita Sah, explains how chronotypes (which determine whether you’re a morning (lark) or evening (owl) person) influence our ethical behavior. 

Q: What piqued your interest in studying chronotypes and morality?   

A: I always have found myself to be more productive later in the day while consistently receiving advice to do my most important work first thing in the morning. There also is a stereotype that suggests that morning people are saintly whereas those that lie-in may lack morals – this is a fascinating research question for anyone who is interested in ethics.

Q: What is the “morning morality effect” and how does it relate to your research?  

A: The morning morality effect suggests that people are more moral in the morning when they have more energy to resist temptations. However, approximately 40 percent of people experience increased energy as the day goes on (often called “owls”) so this effect would not apply to them. Our research investigated the “chronotype morality effect” to understand how people’s ethical decisions can be different due to both chronotype and time of day.

Q: How do chronotypes influence an individuals’ behavior?

A: Chronotypes (which determine whether you’re a morning (lark) or evening (owl) person) influence behavior in a number of different ways. In our research we investigated how people differ in their ethical decisions depending on their chronotype and the time of day. We found that evening people were more likely to be unethical in the morning and morning people were more likely to be unethical late in the evening – the match between chronotype and time of day was a better prediction of ethical behavior than the time of day alone.

Q: How did you test ethical behavior?

A: We tested ethical behavior in controlled settings via two different tasks. In the first study, participants were paid money for solving simple math problems (known as the matrix task among ethics researchers). Participants believed their work was anonymous and so they could get away with over-reporting the number of problems they ‘solved’ to earn more money. However, after the study, we could determine who cheated by over-reporting. The second study used a similar technique but we asked participants to tell us the score of a die that they rolled in private. Again, participants earned more if they reported a higher number. This time we couldn’t determine if any particular individual cheated but overall each group should report an average of 3.5 rolls. We found, as per our predictions that morning people (larks) were more likely to cheat in the evening and evening people (owls) were more likely to cheat in the morning.

Q: Given the findings of the study, what is your advice to employers?

A: Managers may find it helpful to learn the chronotype of employees (and themselves) and create work structures, schedules and hours that match peak times for individuals. Employers who require larks to make challenging, ethical decisions at night or owls to make similar decisions in the morning, run the risk of encouraging unethical behavior. Employers should also carefully consider overtime, shift work, flextime, and requirements during Daylight Savings Time clock changes.

What motivates millennials to leave their jobs and return to school? Georgetown McDonough spoke with Brooks Holtom, associate professor of management, about his research on the topic.

What peaked your interest in studying millennials and their pursuit of graduate education?  
There is a lot of opinion and anecdote in the press about millennials and their approach to life. However, there is a shortage of high-quality research rigorously examining their choices. We sought to design a study that would control for many potential biases — we looked at graduates of a prestigious private school as well as a large state school; we looked at a U.S. sample as well as an Australian sample; we looked across a wide range of majors; and we surveyed multiple times to assess not only attitudes but also behaviors.

How do career goals influence the likelihood of an employee returning to school?
There are intrinsic and extrinsic career goals. We define intrinsic career goals as the extent to which an individual’s career goals include intrinsically motivating attributes, such as continually gaining new skills and knowledge, having interesting and challenging work, and doing work that impacts society. We define extrinsic career goals as the extent to which an individual’s career goals include extrinsically motivating attributes such as visible success, status, and influence within the organization or society, and high financial rewards.

In simple terms, this research shows that people who are intrinsically motivated are more likely to return to graduate school because it helps them to craft more satisfying work. People who are more extrinsically motivated are more likely to continue to work to obtain the visible markers of success — money, promotions, etc.

What we think is most interesting is how career shocks demonstrate a direct relationship to applications to graduate school, regardless of one’s intentions. This suggests that “the best laid plans” can sometimes be altered by unplanned events.

What role do mentors play in this decision?
Organizational mentors are often highly influential in the decision to stay or leave a firm as well as the decision to return to graduate school. Part of the reason for this influence is that they have experience to help a young person examine the past realistically and also anticipate the most likely future.

Given the findings of the study, what is your advice to employers?
Employers are advised to engage in regular career development conversations with their employees —especially relatively young employees. Research clearly shows us that they are at a higher risk of leaving, whether for other jobs or graduate school. To reduce voluntary turnover, they should understand each individual’s career plans and motivations and do their best to provide developmental opportunities in the context of their jobs.

In this Faculty Q&A, Georgetown McDonough discusses capitalism, morals, and The Mickey Mouse Clubhouse with Jason Brennan, assistant professor of strategy, ethics, economics, and public policy and author of Why Not Capitalism? (Routledge, 2014).

Q: What prompted you to write a book on capitalism?
A: With the recent financial crisis, people are once again declaring that capitalism is dead and that it’s time to look to the socialist alternative. Only this time, the socialists tells us, we need to get it right.

Q: Who is Jerry Cohen, and how did he influence your book?
A: G. A. Cohen was the most important Marxist philosopher since Marx. Cohen published a popular book called Why Not Socialism? right at the height of the financial crisis. Cohen’s thesis is that market society is intrinsically repugnant. We put up with markets and private property only because we think we have no better alternative. Cohen says that if socialism doesn’t work, the problem is with us, not with socialism. We are too selfish and diffident to make it work.

Most people aren’t Marxists, but Cohen’s ideas are surprisingly common. Cohen is a spokesperson for a widespread suspicion of markets. Almost everyone agrees that if we were saints, we’d be socialist.

What I do in my book is flip Cohen’s argument around on him. I grant Cohen pretty much all of his premises, but then show that what follows is the vindication of capitalism. I defend the surprising thesis that even if we were morally perfect, we would still have reason to prefer a market society to socialism.

Q: How do economics and morality influence the perceptions of capitalism and socialism?
A: Most people think capitalism is superior from an economic point of view, but socialism is superior from a moral point of view. But, I think, good defense of market society needs to be in the language of morality, not just in the language of economics. There is much to dislike in real life capitalism, but also in real life socialism. Still, I think it’s reassuring to realize that the basic institutions of our society, however corrupt they may be in practice, are not inherently evil.

Q: Why do you reference the Mickey Mouse Clubhouse in your book? What is the significance?
A: The children’s CGI-animated cartoon The Mickey Mouse Clubhouse (not the old Mickey Mouse Club) presents a close-to-utopian capitalist society. If you watch it closely, you can see that it shows us why even morally perfect people would still use markets.

There has been a debate for 200 years between socialism and capitalism. Somehow, most people now think that capitalism won that debate, but socialism still captures the moral high ground. Yet a child’s cartoon can help us end that debate once and for all. Socialism doesn’t even get the moral high ground.

Georgetown McDonough recently spoke with Assistant Professor of Management Chris Long about how managers can earn trust among their employees and who he thinks are great leaders.

What prompted you to conduct research on what managers can do to earn trust?
Trust is a central component of positive relationships. Several years ago, I decided to focus on examining how and why managers and leaders build trust because there was (and still is) comparatively little work in this area. We already know a lot about the components of trust and why it is important. However, because researchers have not focused on what leads managers to build trust, we know relatively much less about why managers are motivated to engage in trust-building activities. These things are important to understand because we want to be able to create situations where leaders are willing and able to readily build trusting relationships with their employees.

What did you discover about how managers develop relationships with employees?
First of all, trust is very important to managers and they spend a lot of time working to gain and maintain the trust of their subordinates. Second, that managers often work systematically to build the types of trust they need to foster positive working relationships with their employees.

What are the three forms of trust and how do they relate to certain professions?
Research has repeatedly demonstrated how managers build trust when they act reliably (with integrity), competently (as a leader), and benevolently (with concern and consideration) towards their employees

Regarding how managers work to promote trust, the relationships that I and my co-authors have identified are quite logical when you think about it. Managers who are focused on motivating their subordinates to achieve specific outcomes will focus their trust-building efforts to demonstrating their integrity and reliability to assure their employees that they will receive the rewards they expect and desire when their work is completed. Alternatively, managers who require their subordinates to execute rules and standard operating procedures tend to promote trust by demonstrating their competence. They do this because they are asking their employees to perform their tasks in a certain way and want to increase their subordinates’ confidence that they know what they are talking about. Lastly, managers who require their subordinates to adopt and identify with strong sets of values build trust by demonstrating personal care and concern for their employees. Because they are asking their employees to identify with them or the organizations they represent, they want increase their employees’ confidence that their personal needs and interests will be promoted and protected under their leadership.

How will your research impact the business community?
This research provides insights into how managers can foster more positive working relationships with their employees. In addition, managers who engage in the combinations of activities described in the research not only will be able to more effectively achieve their objectives, but do so in ways that use fewer resources and are, frankly, more enjoyable.
 
Who do you admire most as a leader?
If I had to pick, I would pick three (not in any particular order). First, Nelson Mandela. That man was simply a gift from God. Through his words and deeds, he taught us all how to summon the “best angels of our nature,” to forgive, work together, and move forward from dark spaces of conflict and disagreement in which we often find ourselves. Second, John Kennedy for the way he was able to motivate and inspire others to do things that they previously thought were impossible. Third, Jack Welch and how he transformed GE through his sheer organizing genius.

While it is important to identify “the greats,” even more important to me is developing an ability to recognize great leaders and leadership in the spaces that surround me every day. Because of this, I am looking for “leadership moments” all the time. I see these moments being generated by my colleagues, my students, by my wife and children. There are things that they are doing to inspire and motivate others every day. When I see those things happening, I try to acknowledge and celebrate them.

For example, my children are going to a new school next year and their principal is an unbelievable leader. There are lots of things about stewardship that this guy could teach many top CEOs. He has created a culture for his staff and students that is generating extraordinary experiences for them every day. He is amazingly inspiring.


Georgetown McDonough sits down with Assistant Professor of Accounting Allison Koester to talk about her research on which managers are able to better align tax and business strategies.

Q: What prompted you to conduct research on operational efficiency and tax returns?
A: Increasing competition and rising costs means everyone needs to do more with less. With ever-growing federal budget deficits, how to raise revenue is a hot topic on the Hill, and many corporations have been under intense scrutiny for the amount of corporate income taxes they pay. We wanted to see whether managers who were really good at doing more with less (i.e., minimizing inputs to maximizing output) were also really good at tax planning.

Q: What did you find?
A: Psychology and management “tone at the top” research tells us that managers matter in all sorts of corporate decision-making scenarios, but prior to our study researchers have been unable to identify an individual and broadly available managerial trait related to corporate tax planning. So we looked at managers’ operational efficiency and tax planning, and we found a very large and robust positive relation between the two.

Q: What are some areas where higher-ability mangers make decisions and investments that suggest better tax planning?
A: We explore several channels where we expect higher ability managers to identify the most tax-efficient way to engage in operating, investing, and financing decisions. For example, firms undertake R&D to develop innovative products and establish operations outside the US to be closer to their customers and suppliers.  We expect higher ability managers to structure their R&D and foreign location decisions more tax-efficiently – i.e., optimize the U.S. R&D tax credit and structure transfer prices so profits are sourced to lower tax jurisdictions. We find that R&D activities and foreign operations, as well as capital expenditures and leverage, are important avenues through which tax avoidance is achieved by higher-ability managers.

Q: Approximately how much money can an organization save through more effective tax planning?  
A: The combined federal and state statutory corporate tax rates are currently about 42%. Based on the managerial ability metric we use in our study, we find that the top 10% of management teams pay taxes at a rate of only 25% of their pretax income. The average pretax income for these companies is $211 million, which translates to over $35 million in annual tax savings.

Q: What should board members and shareholders takeaway from this study?
A: Raising external debt and equity are costly. Shareholders benefit when firms fund business operations through internally generated resources, and shareholders also benefit when firms make dividend payments and engage in share repurchases. As tax planning preserves firm resources for these two potential uses, shareholders benefit when boards of directors identify and hire managers that bring both operational efficiency and tax planning skills to the table.

Professor of Management Robert Bies discusses with Georgetown McDonough his research on how business leaders deliver bad news — and why it matters.What prompted you to conduct research on the delivery of bad news in an organization? When I ask leaders to name their most difficult tasks, invariably the delivery of bad news is at the top of their list. Given that delivering bad news is such a challenging task for leaders, it led me to study the different strategies leaders use to deliver bad news — and how they do so effectively and ineffectively. Why should we care about how to deliver bad news? Life in organizations is punctuated by bad news. Each and every day, somebody is delivering bad news or receiving it. Whether it is giving negative performance feedback or announcing employee layoffs — or just saying no to a request — how one delivers the news has a big impact on how people react to the news.Why is bad news difficult to deliver? Bad news is a difficult task for leaders because it can be emotionally distressing. For example, those who deliver bad news may become a target of anger and retaliation by the recipient of the news. But, it can also be difficult because people do not know how to deliver bad news effectively. Bad news can be easier to deliver with experience and the right set of skills, which is the focus of my research.Your research suggests there are three phases of delivering bad news. Why are they important? The phases are preparation, delivery, and the transition. Most people focus on the actual delivery of the news, but so much can occur before the news is delivered — which is the preparation phase — that impacts how people react to the news. And after the bad news is delivered, leaders are not done because they have to demonstrate to a variety of different audiences that things are getting better, which is the transition phase. If the transition phase is managed properly, the bad news may become good news.When should someone deliver bad news in person vs. over the phone or via email? The rule of thumb is this: the more serious the bad news, the more important it is that you deliver it face-to-face. You don’t fire somebody via e-mail or a text or a tweet. And don’t forget, there are the “survivors” — those who still have a job but are affected by how you delivered the news to those who lost their jobs. The costs of losing the human touch in delivering very bad news can be damaging to leaders and their organizations, as was so vividly illustrated in the movie Up in the Air.How will your research impact business leaders? Whether a company’s earning fall short of stockholder expectations, or people cannot find a job in today’s economy, or a website is not effectively enrolling people for healthcare, bad news events seem the rule of the day, no longer the exception. It is in these times that a leader’s ability is most tested. Whether it is business or in government, delivering bad news more effectively can help leaders manage the anger of people constructively and rebuild their trust, both of which are necessary to motivate and mobilize people to move forward.

Professor of Management Robert Bies discusses with Georgetown McDonough his research on how business leaders deliver bad news — and why it matters.

What prompted you to conduct research on the delivery of bad news in an organization?
When I ask leaders to name their most difficult tasks, invariably the delivery of bad news is at the top of their list. Given that delivering bad news is such a challenging task for leaders, it led me to study the different strategies leaders use to deliver bad news — and how they do so effectively and ineffectively.

Why should we care about how to deliver bad news?
Life in organizations is punctuated by bad news. Each and every day, somebody is delivering bad news or receiving it. Whether it is giving negative performance feedback or announcing employee layoffs — or just saying no to a request — how one delivers the news has a big impact on how people react to the news.

Why is bad news difficult to deliver?
Bad news is a difficult task for leaders because it can be emotionally distressing. For example, those who deliver bad news may become a target of anger and retaliation by the recipient of the news. But, it can also be difficult because people do not know how to deliver bad news effectively. Bad news can be easier to deliver with experience and the right set of skills, which is the focus of my research.

Your research suggests there are three phases of delivering bad news. Why are they important?
The phases are preparation, delivery, and the transition. Most people focus on the actual delivery of the news, but so much can occur before the news is delivered — which is the preparation phase — that impacts how people react to the news. And after the bad news is delivered, leaders are not done because they have to demonstrate to a variety of different audiences that things are getting better, which is the transition phase. If the transition phase is managed properly, the bad news may become good news.

When should someone deliver bad news in person vs. over the phone or via email?
The rule of thumb is this: the more serious the bad news, the more important it is that you deliver it face-to-face. You don’t fire somebody via e-mail or a text or a tweet. And don’t forget, there are the “survivors” — those who still have a job but are affected by how you delivered the news to those who lost their jobs. The costs of losing the human touch in delivering very bad news can be damaging to leaders and their organizations, as was so vividly illustrated in the movie Up in the Air.

How will your research impact business leaders?
Whether a company’s earning fall short of stockholder expectations, or people cannot find a job in today’s economy, or a website is not effectively enrolling people for healthcare, bad news events seem the rule of the day, no longer the exception. It is in these times that a leader’s ability is most tested. Whether it is business or in government, delivering bad news more effectively can help leaders manage the anger of people constructively and rebuild their trust, both of which are necessary to motivate and mobilize people to move forward.

Name: Tara Miller

From: Philadelphia, PA

Student/staff/faculty? Student and staff (for one more day!)

What brought you to McDonough today?

Today is my last day as the assistant director of digital marketing for Georgetown McDonough. It has probably been the greatest last day at a job ever because I got to hangout with Jack the Bulldog. 

What do you do outside McDonough?

Outside of working at Georgetown, I am an evening MBA student at MSB as well. Although I only have one more week until I complete my MBA. Working and being a student at Georgetown has been such a wonderful honor and I am going to be very sad to say goodbye. 

What inspires you? 
I am inspired by the true personal transformations I have seen my colleagues and classmates experience here at Georgetown. Of course there are hard days, struggles, and things we wish we could change, but being a part of the Georgetown community has an amazing effect on people. I have seen people completely turn around their careers, gain confidence as leaders, and form life-long relationships. Looking back on my experience, I know all of these things are true for me. And I never would have had these transformations if it wasn’t for Georgetown. 

Thank you, MSB. I will miss being here everyday, but I am excited to represent Georgetown now as an alum!

Name: Tara Miller

From: Philadelphia, PA

Student/staff/faculty? Student and staff (for one more day!)

What brought you to McDonough today?

Today is my last day as the assistant director of digital marketing for Georgetown McDonough. It has probably been the greatest last day at a job ever because I got to hangout with Jack the Bulldog.

What do you do outside McDonough?

Outside of working at Georgetown, I am an evening MBA student at MSB as well. Although I only have one more week until I complete my MBA. Working and being a student at Georgetown has been such a wonderful honor and I am going to be very sad to say goodbye.

What inspires you?

I am inspired by the true personal transformations I have seen my colleagues and classmates experience here at Georgetown. Of course there are hard days, struggles, and things we wish we could change, but being a part of the Georgetown community has an amazing effect on people. I have seen people completely turn around their careers, gain confidence as leaders, and form life-long relationships. Looking back on my experience, I know all of these things are true for me. And I never would have had these transformations if it wasn’t for Georgetown.

Thank you, MSB. I will miss being here everyday, but I am excited to represent Georgetown now as an alum!

Name: Michael BergenCurrently living: Arlington, VAProgram and graduating class: McDonough School of Business (MBA), graduated in 2009 
Tell us about your experience since graduating from Georgetown: After graduating, I had the opportunity to work at Deloitte Consulting for over three years focusing on international competitive intelligence. After that I moved to Toffler Associates, a boutique advisory firm in Reston, VA helping commercial clients plan, understand, and create their future. The work there is very interesting and I have the privilege of working within the highest levels of companies, but it is my most recent endeavor in which I am most proud of.  What are you currently working on/where are you working? Being a Marine Corps veteran, I am an avid shooter and sportsman. My best friend Bryan Stear is an astrophysicist working for the government and has had the ambition to open a shooting range that would change the entire industry. Last month I fulfilled one of my goals after graduating Georgetown of starting a business by partnering with Bryan to open Shoot Indoors LLC, an indoor firing range in the suburbs of Denver.
Bryan used his understanding of physics and mathematics to not only target the precise area to open his business based on population growth and traffic, but also design a new shape of the firing range that cut our building costs in half. Shoot Indoors Inc has a provisionary patent on this design and is currently in the process of filing for a full patent. 
Shoot Indoors has just recently opened on January 11th 2014 to solid crowds. The 11,630-square-foot space near the intersection of U.S. Highway 287 and Commerce Street in Broomfield, CO outside of Denver includes ten 25-yard lanes as well as space for safety and certification courses. The facility accommodates handguns, rifles and shotguns with a focus on safety and a modern atmosphere. There are free introductory gun-safety orientation classes four nights per week and more in-depth firearms courses five nights per week for a fee. 
Our plan is to expand in the future based off of current success with the possibility of franchises being available. Georgetown has given me a solid foundation for business and I hope to translate that into success in the real world. We believe in better Shooting through Science and it is my goal not to become a business case used at Georgetown MSB on why a company failed.  What is your advice for current Georgetown students as they graduate and moving into the business world?
Use your network. Beyond the first-class education you get at Georgetown, the best weapon you will gain when you leave is our network. Not just for finding a job, but for learning about a new market or finding colleagues around the world if you do business internationally. When you meet another Georgetown alum, you know they have been through the same academic gauntlet as you and that forges an instant bond. My other advice is go to more basketball games while you are in school, I regret not going to more.
What is your favorite memory from Georgetown?
I can’t narrow it down to just one, so I will take the easy route and list two things. First is the overall atmosphere of the campus. It’s the reason I came back from the West Coast to go to school here. There is a simultaneous energy and calm when you walk through the heart of campus. While I was in school if I ever needed inspiration, I would trek though school grounds to find motivation. Along the same vein, if I ever needed to clear my mind, nothing did that better than a jog around Georgetown in the early morning.
The second is more of a legacy and revolves around the connections I have made while I was at MSB. After being out of school for almost 5 years, it is impressive to see what my classmates have achieved in their careers and in life. When catching up with friends, I am awestruck to see the positions of influence and power they have ascended to in such a short time. It is these connections that are the foundations of your personal networks for the rest of your careers.

Name: Michael Bergen
Currently living: Arlington, VA
Program and graduating class: McDonough School of Business (MBA), graduated in 2009 

Tell us about your experience since graduating from Georgetown: After graduating, I had the opportunity to work at Deloitte Consulting for over three years focusing on international competitive intelligence. After that I moved to Toffler Associates, a boutique advisory firm in Reston, VA helping commercial clients plan, understand, and create their future. The work there is very interesting and I have the privilege of working within the highest levels of companies, but it is my most recent endeavor in which I am most proud of.

What are you currently working on/where are you working?
Being a Marine Corps veteran, I am an avid shooter and sportsman. My best friend Bryan Stear is an astrophysicist working for the government and has had the ambition to open a shooting range that would change the entire industry. Last month I fulfilled one of my goals after graduating Georgetown of starting a business by partnering with Bryan to open Shoot Indoors LLC, an indoor firing range in the suburbs of Denver.

Bryan used his understanding of physics and mathematics to not only target the precise area to open his business based on population growth and traffic, but also design a new shape of the firing range that cut our building costs in half. Shoot Indoors Inc has a provisionary patent on this design and is currently in the process of filing for a full patent.

Shoot Indoors has just recently opened on January 11th 2014 to solid crowds. The 11,630-square-foot space near the intersection of U.S. Highway 287 and Commerce Street in Broomfield, CO outside of Denver includes ten 25-yard lanes as well as space for safety and certification courses. The facility accommodates handguns, rifles and shotguns with a focus on safety and a modern atmosphere. There are free introductory gun-safety orientation classes four nights per week and more in-depth firearms courses five nights per week for a fee.

Our plan is to expand in the future based off of current success with the possibility of franchises being available. Georgetown has given me a solid foundation for business and I hope to translate that into success in the real world. We believe in better Shooting through Science and it is my goal not to become a business case used at Georgetown MSB on why a company failed.

What is your advice for current Georgetown students as they graduate and moving into the business world?

Use your network. Beyond the first-class education you get at Georgetown, the best weapon you will gain when you leave is our network. Not just for finding a job, but for learning about a new market or finding colleagues around the world if you do business internationally. When you meet another Georgetown alum, you know they have been through the same academic gauntlet as you and that forges an instant bond. My other advice is go to more basketball games while you are in school, I regret not going to more.

What is your favorite memory from Georgetown?

I can’t narrow it down to just one, so I will take the easy route and list two things. First is the overall atmosphere of the campus. It’s the reason I came back from the West Coast to go to school here. There is a simultaneous energy and calm when you walk through the heart of campus. While I was in school if I ever needed inspiration, I would trek though school grounds to find motivation. Along the same vein, if I ever needed to clear my mind, nothing did that better than a jog around Georgetown in the early morning.

The second is more of a legacy and revolves around the connections I have made while I was at MSB. After being out of school for almost 5 years, it is impressive to see what my classmates have achieved in their careers and in life. When catching up with friends, I am awestruck to see the positions of influence and power they have ascended to in such a short time. It is these connections that are the foundations of your personal networks for the rest of your careers.

Spotted @ McDonough
Name: Corey McKeon (@xmckeon on Twitter)From: New HampshireStudent/staff/faculty? Assistant Director of MBA Admissions

What brought you to McDonough today?

Work. I love coming to work at McDonough as my role in admissions focuses on marketing. I’m always looking for new, creative ways to share the Georgetown MBA experience with prospective and admitted students through social media, e-mail, video, webinar and hosting events around the world. 

What do you do outside McDonough?

Washington, DC is a great city with an endless variety of opportunities. Outside of McDonough, you can usually find me at the Adams Morgan Farmer’s Market, the National Zoo or running through Rock Creek. As an alumni of Georgetown, I have a network all over the world and try to meet fellow alums when I’m traveling. 
What inspires you? 
Creativity. You can often find me reading on my phone using the Feed.ly app. I follow a lot of blogs focused on the creative process, inspiration and trends in design. I’m really inspired by emerging trends and utility — I’m constantly exploring the cross-section of new media and how we incorporate a new tool into daily use, and then when it becomes a trend.

Spotted @ McDonough

Name: Corey McKeon (@xmckeon on Twitter)
From: New Hampshire
Student/staff/faculty? Assistant Director of MBA Admissions

What brought you to McDonough today?

Work. I love coming to work at McDonough as my role in admissions focuses on marketing. I’m always looking for new, creative ways to share the Georgetown MBA experience with prospective and admitted students through social media, e-mail, video, webinar and hosting events around the world. 

What do you do outside McDonough?

Washington, DC is a great city with an endless variety of opportunities. Outside of McDonough, you can usually find me at the Adams Morgan Farmer’s Market, the National Zoo or running through Rock Creek. As an alumni of Georgetown, I have a network all over the world and try to meet fellow alums when I’m traveling. 

What inspires you? 

Creativity. You can often find me reading on my phone using the Feed.ly app. I follow a lot of blogs focused on the creative process, inspiration and trends in design. I’m really inspired by emerging trends and utility — I’m constantly exploring the cross-section of new media and how we incorporate a new tool into daily use, and then when it becomes a trend.

Name: Samantha CarrollCurrently living: Washington, DCProgram and graduating class: MSB Full-time Program, graduated in 2006
Tell us about your experience since graduating from Georgetown:Upon graduating from Georgetown,  I entered the world of consulting.  I worked for Booz Allen Hamilton on their Strategic Communications and Change Management team as a Senior Consultant.  Later, I became Editor-At-Large for The Family Groove, LLC, an online parenting magazine rated by Real Simple magazine as the “Best Daily Destination” among parenting websites.  I was responsible for building market share, advising the CEO on overall initiatives, and acting as a magazine contributor.  Applying my consulting experience in the healthcare, wellness, technology, non-profit, and professional services industries, I started SMC Communications, a full-service strategic communications and marketing consultancy.  I advise clients on the overall direction of their growth strategies, branding efforts, and content development.  Finding solutions to complex, online and offline marketing challenges and translating complicated initiatives and programs into easily understood messaging is the basis for my business.  I advise clients in the legal services, real estate, non-profit, professional services, and consulting industries on everything from communications planning to social media strategy to full execution of re-branding campaigns. 
What are you currently working on/where are you working?I currently own and run SMC Communications, LLC (www.smccommunications.org), a full service strategic communications and marketing consultancy.  

What is your advice for current Georgetown students as they graduate and moving into the business world?Know where your passion lives, work hard to apply that passion, and absorb all that the corporate world has to offer.  Be confident that the education you’ve received at Georgetown has prepared you to speak up at the table. 
What is your favorite memory from Georgetown?My favorite memory from Georgetown is traveling to Vietnam to consult a fast-growing, Vietnamese beverage company.  It was an experience of a lifetime. Applying the tools and tactics learned at Georgetown to a company facing many of the same challenges in the real world that we had studied and analyzed in the classroom was an unbelievably rewarding experience. I will never forget the company’s gratitude for the work we produced for them, and I knew I was making the right decision to enter a service-based industry. 

Name: Samantha Carroll
Currently living: Washington, DC
Program and graduating class: MSB Full-time Program, graduated in 2006

Tell us about your experience since graduating from Georgetown:
Upon graduating from Georgetown,  I entered the world of consulting.  I worked for Booz Allen Hamilton on their Strategic Communications and Change Management team as a Senior Consultant.  Later, I became Editor-At-Large for The Family Groove, LLC, an online parenting magazine rated by Real Simple magazine as the Best Daily Destination” among parenting websites.  I was responsible for building market share, advising the CEO on overall initiatives, and acting as a magazine contributor.  Applying my consulting experience in the healthcare, wellness, technology, non-profit, and professional services industries, I started SMC Communications, a full-service strategic communications and marketing consultancy.  I advise clients on the overall direction of their growth strategies, branding efforts, and content development.  Finding solutions to complex, online and offline marketing challenges and translating complicated initiatives and programs into easily understood messaging is the basis for my business.  I advise clients in the legal services, real estate, non-profit, professional services, and consulting industries on everything from communications planning to social media strategy to full execution of re-branding campaigns. 

What are you currently working on/where are you working?
I currently own and run SMC Communications, LLC (www.smccommunications.org), a full service strategic communications and marketing consultancy.  

What is your advice for current Georgetown students as they graduate and moving into the business world?
Know where your passion lives, work hard to apply that passion, and absorb all that the corporate world has to offer.  Be confident that the education you’ve received at Georgetown has prepared you to speak up at the table. 

What is your favorite memory from Georgetown?
My favorite memory from Georgetown is traveling to Vietnam to consult a fast-growing, Vietnamese beverage company.  It was an experience of a lifetime. Applying the tools and tactics learned at Georgetown to a company facing many of the same challenges in the real world that we had studied and analyzed in the classroom was an unbelievably rewarding experience. I will never forget the company’s gratitude for the work we produced for them, and I knew I was making the right decision to enter a service-based industry. 

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